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Swapping a cpu


anlaoch
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Hi.

Just wondering whether I can swap a pentium 4 (2.8ghz) with an AMD socket 7 (1.8ghz). Can this be done or am I in danger of wrecking things? I'm trying to determine whether the processor in one computer is the root cause of why the computer starts when cold, but then won't restart after it's been running.

I'm thinking if the processor runs well in a computer that I know has no faults, then I can rule it out as the cause of problems.

Thanks.

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Thanks for the replies.

I've got one pc which has a P4, and which works when cold, but if it's been running, then once you shut it down, you can forget about it for a couple of hours. There won't be a gig out of the processor. I reckon it's got to be the cpu overheating, but it's well seated, the fans are working, and I've applied a fresh layer of thermal paste too.

I made a mistake in my first posting, the AMD machine is a socket A board, not socket 7. Probably doesn't matter re: swapping cpu's.

I've tested the power supply, and all readings are correct for that, so I know it can't be the power supply.

Any suggestions?

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Sounds like the chipset is too hot. :)

Or something else on the motherboard. Somehow, the PSU isn't getting the signal to turn on from the motherboard.

I wouldn't always rule out the PSU. Try this. Unplug every power cord from the PSU and turn the PSU off. Get a metal paperclip and bend it so you get two pins sticking together. Find the green wire on the main ATX connector and use the paper clip to short it to any of the black wires. Turn the PSU on - the fan should start spinning now. If it starts up and the voltages are ok (check with a multimeter) you should be ok.

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if it's been running, then once you shut it down, you can forget about it for a couple of hours. There won't be a gig out of the processor.

What happens exactly ? Do you get any sound, a led, running fans, (no)video, nothing at all ?

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Just to go over the questions posed:

- Bonestonne: I've checked the dust situation, and it doesn't appear to be an issue, the machine is relatively new and is spotless inside.

- Malmal: The chipset may be overheating, but how would I know. I take it by "chipset" you mean the chipset on the mobo, not the cpu? Is there a test for checking if the chipset is overheating (there are no temperature displays in the bios)? Equally, is there a fix, or do you just bin the mobo and start again?

- Zxian: When using the psu tester, the psu fan starts up each time. I don't have a multimeter, so I've been relying on the display on the psu tester to confirm that all voltages are as they should be.

- Ponch: since I reapplied fresh thermal paste, the machine is working on 80% of start-ups, so that's helped somewhat. However, when it decides not to start, a green light on the mobo still lights up, the fan on the psu starts up, but nothing else in the machine starts up. The bios doesn't come up, case fans don't work, cd drives don't stir. Nothing. Leave it for an hour or two now, and then whoosh, up she fires, like nothing was ever wrong.

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Ponch: since I reapplied fresh thermal paste, the machine is working on 80% of start-ups, so that's helped somewhat. However, when it decides not to start, a green light on the mobo still lights up, the fan on the psu starts up, but nothing else in the machine starts up. The bios doesn't come up, case fans don't work, cd drives don't stir. Nothing. Leave it for an hour or two now, and then whoosh, up she fires, like nothing was ever wrong.

Your PSU is malfunctioning. Since it starts up its own internal fan, but doesn't provide power to the rest of the system, it's toast. My guess is that the heat from the system is preventing it from making a connection somewhere in the "on" circuit. This kind of thing can happen with old age and poor quality solder.

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Do it.

Don't give stupid information. Someone is asking for help. Just because the answer is obvious for you doesn't mean you have to be condescending.

Too short to imply condescending, and my post did not include any information.

Edited by weEvil
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