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Desktop (vista) won't shutdown properly


fillalph
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I installed Windows Vista Business x64 and am having some problems.

When I shutdown the computer, CPU stops but the fans and dvd drive still have power (I don't know about the harddrive). I have to hold the power button for 4 seconds to turn it off completely. When turning on the computer later, I never get a message saying that windows didn't shutdown properly - this leads me to believe that the shutdown went alright, but for some reason the peripherals don't get command to shutdown.

I have already gone in the power settings and changed it so that the power button and start menu power button "shut down" and in the sleep settings both sleep and hibernate are set to "never".

What I am running:

GA-P35-DS3R rev. 1 (bios F12)

Intel E6550 h 2.33Ghz

XFX 7600GS (driver - 175.16_geforce_winvista_64bit_english_whql)

OCZ Platinum XTC REV.2 PC2-6400 2GB

Corsair HX520W CMPSU-520HX

Western Digital SE16 320GB SATA2

Updated Chipset drivers to v9.0.0.1008

Realtek Audio and Lan drivers are up to date too.

I did the performance shutdown and here is the link to the file: shutdown_BASE+CSWITCH+DRIVERS+POWER_1.etl

Any ideas?

-fillalph

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Sounds like ye old windows 98 days.

Check to make sure ACPI is enabled in the BIOS.

System states

The ACPI specification defines the following seven states (so-called global states) which an ACPI-compliant computer system can be in:

* G0 (S0) Working

* G1 Sleeping subdivides into the four states S1 through S4.

o S1: All processor caches are flushed, and the CPU(s) stop executing instructions. Power to the CPU(s) and RAM is maintained; devices that do not indicate they must remain on may be powered down.

o S2: The CPU is powered off.

o S3: Commonly referred to as Standby or Sleep. RAM is still powered.

o S4: Hibernation. All content of main memory is saved to non-volatile memory such as a hard drive, and is powered down.

* G2 (S5) Soft Off-- G2, S5, and Soft Off are synonyms. G2 is almost the same as G3 Mechanical Off, but some components remain powered so the computer can "wake" from input from the keyboard, clock, modem, LAN, or USB device.[6]

* G3 Mechanical Off: The computer's power consumption approaches close to zero, to the point that the power cord can be removed and the system is safe for disassembly (typically, only the real-time clock is running off its own small battery).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acpi#System_states

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Sounds like ye old windows 98 days.

Check to make sure ACPI is enabled in the BIOS.

System states

The ACPI specification defines the following seven states (so-called global states) which an ACPI-compliant computer system can be in:

* G0 (S0) Working

* G1 Sleeping subdivides into the four states S1 through S4.

o S1: All processor caches are flushed, and the CPU(s) stop executing instructions. Power to the CPU(s) and RAM is maintained; devices that do not indicate they must remain on may be powered down.

o S2: The CPU is powered off.

o S3: Commonly referred to as Standby or Sleep. RAM is still powered.

o S4: Hibernation. All content of main memory is saved to non-volatile memory such as a hard drive, and is powered down.

* G2 (S5) Soft Off-- G2, S5, and Soft Off are synonyms. G2 is almost the same as G3 Mechanical Off, but some components remain powered so the computer can "wake" from input from the keyboard, clock, modem, LAN, or USB device.[6]

* G3 Mechanical Off: The computer's power consumption approaches close to zero, to the point that the power cord can be removed and the system is safe for disassembly (typically, only the real-time clock is running off its own small battery).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acpi#System_states

Won't changing that now change his HAL? Would sysprep need to be run or will Vista survive chaning the HAL?

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Won't changing that now change his HAL? Would sysprep need to be run or will Vista survive chaning the HAL?

Good point.

OP, forget about what I said for the moment. Do the following:

Go to 'Device Manager'. Then go to the 'Computer' heading. What does it say? ACPI-based PC, Standard PC or MPS-based PC?

Let us know, and we'll go from here.

Edited by brucevangeorge
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If Vista is gone and the CPU has "shut down" (whatever that means), then this wouldn't specifically be a Vista problem (the kernel's gone once the shutdown command completes and everything unloads). I am moving this to the hardware section where more eyeballs with experience on this can see it.

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Won't changing that now change his HAL? Would sysprep need to be run or will Vista survive chaning the HAL?

Good point.

Well, it should have been set automatically, if not so more is messed up for sure.

Reset the BIOS to defaults, reinstall Vista 64bit and this time don´t install your own drivers that you downloaded from the net; use Windows update to get the drivers, you don´t need to install drivers by hand... And use SP1 always!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Guys,

Thanks for the responses.

@brucevangeorge: It says ACPI x64-based PC

@cluberti: when I say the CPU has shutdown I mean that the only thing "on" is the optical drive (I can open/close the tray) and the fans.

@puntoMX: I haven't made a whole lot of changes to the BIOS. I did switch from IDE to SATA mode - AHCI enabled, no RAID and I manual set my memory timings (to spec though, no overclock). My install is also a slipstream SP1 image (from Microsoft, not nLited).

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@puntoMX: I haven't made a whole lot of changes to the BIOS. I did switch from IDE to SATA mode - AHCI enabled, no RAID and I manual set my memory timings (to spec though, no overclock). My install is also a slipstream SP1 image (from Microsoft, not nLited).
Normally it should take a reinstall of Vista to go from IDE(native) to AHCI mode or by following my procedure in the XP section (works for Vista too), I think something got wrong there. Reinstalling the system would be the fastest way to "fix" your problem; you could be digging for days in the register and comparing files with each other or go back to a restore point when everything was working well. Still I would reinstall it to not walk into problems, something is already messed up and who knows what more ;).
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okay, that changes the story a bit and it should be the motherboard itself that is giving problems, most likely the BIOS, so try to upgrade de very old BIOS (F4) to F11.

Let´s see if that helps...

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Again, sorry that my signature hasn't been updated, but I am running F11 already. I am wondering if perhaps I should change from ACHI --> IDE in the bios and reinstall Vista?

I never had any problems in XP like this but then again, I was using IDE mode.

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My fault, I see it now in your first post. I have almost the same board as you have, just the none-R version, try another SATA port and play with the "native" setting in the BIOS for example, it´s always worth a try ;).

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