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dencorso

Day-to-day running Win 9x/ME with more than 1 GiB RAM

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On Tuesday, June 20, 2017 at 8:26 PM, rloew said:

Maybe in the US. Not necessarily elsewhere. 7 McRib sandwiches won't last very long. My Patch still works ten years later.

The most a big burger would cost might be $6-$8 range so 3 of those $6 dollar burgers still more then the cost a single burger in another country I would think.  Where have you seen $20+ for a single burger outside the US?  Plus who doesn't love 3 good burgers or a decade old Patch?  If the Patch cost reduced to $8-$10 you could skew the statement to be more accurate maybe in a restaurant.  But the McRibs are harder to find which makes them special.

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On 12/25/2014 at 3:42 PM, dencorso said:

And the patch is not that expensive... what's the actual cost of one single hamburger (not cheeseburger) at the McDonald's nearest to you?

I never said, nor implied, that the patch cost the same as a single hamburger. I simply asked how much does it cost in the US. If someone had replied to my question, then I intended to calculate how many hamburgers are required to buy the RAM limitation patch. As it is, nobody ever replied to my question, so I let go.

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6 hours ago, dencorso said:

I simply asked how much does it cost in the US. If someone had replied to my question, then I intended to calculate how many hamburgers are required to buy the RAM limitation patch. As it is, nobody ever replied to my question, so I let go.

To be fair you asked an otiose question :w00t::ph34r:

http://www.fastfoodmenuprices.com/mcdonalds-prices/

Besides that, using McDonalds prices is extremely appropriate :thumbup as - not so casually - they are used in the by now internationally recognized Big Mac Index:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Mac_Index

And - within the US - the QPI:

https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/mortgages/home-search/quarter-pounder-index-most-least-expensive-cities/

the above 2013 prices (excluded Alaska and Hawaii ) show some non-trivial variation, $4.52 in Rhode Island vs. $2.24 in Arkansas  is almost exactly a 2:1 ratio.

jaclaz



 

Edited by jaclaz

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Here in the UK, it always used to be the price of Mars Bars that was used for price comparisons!
:lol:
 

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4 minutes ago, Dave-H said:

Here in the UK, it always used to be the price of Mars Bars that was used for price comparisons!
:lol:

 

Well the Big Mac Index was started out by the Economist, which last like I checked was UK based alright (since 1843):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Economist

I would venture to say that it sounds as British as something can be. :dubbio:

jaclaz
 

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Well I must say that I didn't know that the Big Mac based comparisons started with the Economist magazine in the UK!
The Mars Bar comparison always used to be used by British newspapers long before the delights of McDonalds were really known about here.
:)
 

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9 minutes ago, Dave-H said:

Well I must say that I didn't know that the Big Mac based comparisons started with the Economist magazine in the UK!
The Mars Bar comparison always used to be used by British newspapers long before the delights of McDonalds were really known about here.
:)

 

Well, you wouldn't want the Financial Times to use the same scale as The Economist, wouldn't you?

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/9f128868-68b4-11da-bd30-0000779e2340.html?ft_site=falcon&desktop=true#axzz4kqyy3M5c

but I believe the Mars Bar is more related to inflation or differential of buying capacity over time (but "domestic", not as comparison with other countries), just as the Freddo Index (which also is connected to the Mars Bar one):

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/08/this-is-how-much-a-freddo-will-cost-by-2030/
 

https://www.vouchercloud.com/resources/the-freddo-index

While the MarS Bar is "international" the Freddo is a British only brand/name- :unsure:

jaclaz


 

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13 hours ago, jaclaz said:

To be fair you asked an otiose question :w00t::ph34r:

http://www.fastfoodmenuprices.com/mcdonalds-prices/

Besides that, using McDonalds prices is extremely appropriate :thumbup as - not so casually - they are used in the by now internationally recognized Big Mac Index:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Mac_Index

And - within the US - the QPI:

https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/mortgages/home-search/quarter-pounder-index-most-least-expensive-cities/

the above 2013 prices (excluded Alaska and Hawaii ) show some non-trivial variation, $4.52 in Rhode Island vs. $2.24 in Arkansas  is almost exactly a 2:1 ratio.

jaclaz

Hmmm interesting choice of word "otiose".  Jaclaz do you use a translator to convert to English or is this your normal English speaking style?  Very soon we might have a Limitation Patch to International Hamburger Exchange Rate.

I say to be fair Carl's Junior / Hardee's 6 Dollar Burger is the average big burger in the U.S.  Maybe the organic beef version cost $8.  Any other good burger prices globally in your areas fellow MSFN?  This will solve Dencorso's interest plus make me hungry.  I already donated 3 very good big burgers for the Limitation Patch so I felt maybe Dencorso got a big discount when he said in an earlier statement I thought he was hinting he only paid for the cost of one hamburger. :P

Edited by 98SE

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3 hours ago, jaclaz said:

Well, you wouldn't want the Financial Times to use the same scale as The Economist, wouldn't you?

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/9f128868-68b4-11da-bd30-0000779e2340.html?ft_site=falcon&desktop=true#axzz4kqyy3M5c

but I believe the Mars Bar is more related to inflation or differential of buying capacity over time (but "domestic", not as comparison with other countries), just as the Freddo Index (which also is connected to the Mars Bar one):

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/08/this-is-how-much-a-freddo-will-cost-by-2030/
 

https://www.vouchercloud.com/resources/the-freddo-index

While the MarS Bar is "international" the Freddo is a British only brand/name- :unsure:

jaclaz

Mars Bar?  Hmmm... I never thought it to be that special here.  Maybe one day when Elon Musk takes us to Mars these will start selling like hotcakes.  Freddo vs Mars Index... which will succeed in the future you think?  Snicker's seems to be more favored over Mars Bars I thought for a candy bar.  I barely see any Mars Bar commercials.  But the King sized Snicker's can cost close to $2.  Only the McDonald's Dollar Menu used to sell hamburgers (usually no ham in these) so they just call them burgers as low as $1 a few years back then the price jumped back up to almost $2.  McChicken and McDouble and Value Fries for $3 plus tax.  No more Arch Deluxe.  Not sure if I ever had a McPizza or a McLobster but they are very McFly.

http://www.ranker.com/list/discontinued-mcdonalds-menu-items/molly-gander

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9 minutes ago, 98SE said:

Jaclaz do you use a translator to convert to English or is this your normal English speaking style?

Of course, he doesn't! Machine translation sucks! Moreover, those non-native speakers who acquire fluency above a certain threshhold (who also are a minority among the non-native speakers of any language) usually have a wider and more varied vocabulary than native speakers, particularly because such people tend to be able to speak more than two languages...

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1 hour ago, dencorso said:

Of course, he doesn't! Machine translation sucks! Moreover, those non-native speakers who acquire fluency above a certain threshhold (who also are a minority among the non-native speakers of any language) usually have a wider and more varied vocabulary than native speakers, particularly because such people tend to be able to speak more than two languages...

No don't say that.  It's getting better all the time.  Maybe in 1990s it was terrible.  Now we have Rosetta Stone and real time smartphone translators.  It will be a matter of time when we have the equivalent of a Star Trek universal translator where it will be automatic.  Jaclaz uses some esoteric words now and then mixed with standard colloquial.  Usually translators give you these odd words.

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Automatic translation is very often terrible, rest assured that the adjective otiose has been chosen very carefully, hand picked among a number of possible candidates, and intentionally posted in Aldine, what you would call italic.

Particularly, it was a comment aimed to Dencorso, we speak languages that share a common latin origin and as such it is often fun for us to use here and there some latin-derived words that an average native English speaker would never use (and possibly doesn't even know), even if they are correct.

@dencorso ;)

https://maeperfeita.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/preguic3a7a-quino.jpg

jaclaz


 

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